Beware the Entrepreneurship Industry

This may be a controversial post. You’ve been warned. This post is from my point of view as an advisor to small business. I realize that I occupy a place in the “industry” landscape, and that like the bigger wheels in the machine, I too turn a profit from providing services to small business. As a lawyer, however, I have a duty of loyalty to my clients – called a fiduciary duty. It isn’t optional, it’s the law. This means a bunch of things – to be competent and diligent in my work, to act in my clients’ best interest, honesty, and to keep your information confidential. Most of the other people you’ll come in contact with in the business world don’t have such a duty – and therein lies the risk that we call “doing business.”

I’ll get to the point.

I’ve noticed a trend towards the industrialization of entrepreneurship these days, and the more I think about it, the less comfortable I am with it. When I say “industry”, I’m talking about making labour systematic. The same business model that created the assembly line to make business more “economically efficient” is now being applied to entrepreneurship. There’s big money to be made. Investors and big business have realized that in many cases it’s more economically efficient to buy innovation than to innovate.

But how do you groom small, innovative businesses into ones that will slip neatly into the world of big business, and global financial markets as they grow? The answer is to industrialize entrepreneurship. As this system gains momentum, there’s an explosion of organizations which provide ready-made solutions to most of your small business needs.

Most of these organizations exist to make money….

… off of you…

… and none of them owe you a duty of loyalty.

I’m not saying that these organizations are out to get you. There are plenty of amazing collaborators out there. All I’m saying is that a healthy dose of caution, and an unhealthy dose research before getting into bed with them is in order. Any time you give up equity (shares) in your company it’s like taking on a business partner. They invest time, money, and resources in making your company grow. With the money comes the expectation of profit. You, as the one with the business or idea, will want to be assured that your partners will pull their weight, and that you’ll have a way out if they don’t. In return, there are some pretty thick strings attached to the investment. They’re gamblers in a way. Gamblers with a much bigger stack than you, more experience in these kinds of deals, and an uncanny ability to lawyer plucky little startups into the ground if they feel wronged. Choosing the wrong horse to hitch your wagon to could cost you your business.

In this article, I’ll talk about two of the big growth sectors in the entrepreneurship industry – high risk investors, and growth programs. I’ll deal with high risk investors first – angel investors and venture capital. Then I’ll move on to the growth programs – incubators and accelerators.

High Risk Investors

The starting point to understanding high risk investors is to understand the basic business proposition from the investor’s point of view. Angel investors, and to a greater extent, venture capital, are betting on the success of your business. In return, they demand returns commensurate with that level of risk. Particularly for VC, they may invest in ten companies, and only get a return on one – meaning the one that hits, they’ve got to make all the money back that they invested in all ten, plus a healthy profit margin – otherwise they’ll be out of business. That means they’re going to do almost everything in their power to make sure that they get their money back. This includes attaching strict, investor-friendly terms to the financing. This also includes using their networks and contacts to spur growth. They’re putting a lot of eggs in your basket, and approach the deal accordingly.

Angels

An angel investor is a wealthy person or group of investors who are willing to pony up startup capital for businesses that they think will succeed. Some angels specialize in raw startups, while others are only interested in companies that have already reached a certain critical mass. While the term “angel” might make them seem benevolent, they’re planning on making money off of your work. Their investment buys a part of your company – between 10-50% typically – and often gives the investor a say in how the business is run. They think they can make money on your idea – and if you don’t do it for them, they may take the reins and do it themselves. Angels see the end-game too, where they can realize the return on their investment. Cashing in. This often means selling the business – either to a third party or by taking the company public. If your end game is different, you may have found the wrong angel. If selling isn’t their goal, they might intend to grow your company in a way that benefits their other business interests.

Angel investment is attractive because as soon as they’re on board, it’s in the angel’s interest to use their connections and experience to help the business. A good angel can open up supply or sales channels that were previously out of reach, guide you through tough negotiations, and provide mentorship to help you develop your business skills. On the other hand, an angel whose intentions aren’t so angelic could take control of the business, fire you, and force you to sell them your shares at a discount. If they have a bad reputation in the business community, you could be tainted with that as well. I’ve seen all of these things and more. Do your homework, and get advice before, during, and after negotiations with angel investors.

Venture Capital

Venture capital is a different beast altogether. VC is usually a fund where many professional investors, serial entrepreneurs, large companies with innovation budgets pool their money together. The fund is managed by specialists who look for high-growth, high-potential businesses to invest in. Usually they’re looking for an “adolescent” business, rather than a raw startup, will invest for several years, and expect a return of around 10 times what they invested over that time. VC will usually get paid out first – often within 1-2 years – and take a percentage of ownership of the company. Venture capital is usually a one-way ticket to an initial public offering, and your investors will do what they must to ensure they get a return. They’ll appoint board members to shepherd their investment, and often have a good deal of say in hiring for key positions. They may replace you as the CEO if they have someone who’ll do better. The investment will usually be a high-interest loan, and secured with shares in the company which will pay the VC back first if the company goes belly-up. The exit plan almost always involves taking the company public. VC is more complex than that – but the important take-away here is that it’s very, very pricey money.

VC is attractive because, if it works, you get rich when the company is sold or taken public. VCs will lend based on their valuation of the idea, rather than their ability to secure their investment on the assets of the company, like a bank would. The downside is, once the VC comes on board, the business ceases to be your baby. Your interests aren’t aligned – the VC is looking out for their investment, not for the best interests of you, the company, or the employees. Most venture capital funds focus on building up the pool of money they manage, rather than mentoring and guiding the business – they’ll often appoint outside board members to represent their interests. The strings attached are large, and tied tightly.

Dealing with High Risk Investors

High risk investors can take your business to the next level in a hurry, and are sometimes the only viable option to fund your research and development. This is especially true for businesses built on ideas, rather than physical assets. Be very, very careful about who you’re dealing with, and understand the deal that you’re making before you sign on the dotted line. Do your research. Get legal and accounting advice. Shop around, and keep these in mind when you’re exploring your options:

  • First, foremost, and always remember – if they’re willing to fund you, then you have something they want. You have leverage in negotiations, and should only take a deal that works for your company.
  • What’s the business/industry background of the people you’re dealing with? What other companies have they worked with, and what results did they get? Talk to those companies, and get a no-bullshit assessment.
  • Who will be appointed to your board? How many other boards do they serve on?
  • Who are their advisors – accounting, legal, etc – and do they come as a package deal? Are they encouraging you to get independent advice before signing?
  • What’s their exit plan? Does it mesh with your vision for the business?

If the investor can’t give you a good answer to those questions, or stands in the way of you finding the answers on your own, run away as fast as you can.

Predatory investors can be hard to spot… until it’s too late. I’ve got a bunch of horror stories from people in my network who jumped at what looked like a good deal… and when they landed, the investor owned the company, and the founder ended up with only a fraction of the value they’d built. They’re smart people who make their living by getting other people to do the grunt work for them… and unscrupulous investors know how to cover their bases. Be cautious, and put in the time and effort to understand them, their goals, and what they expect of you before committing.

Growth Programs

Incubators & Accelerators

These two get lumped together because they fulfill roughly the same role at different stages of a company’s growth. They are, at their core, great business models, and can do a whole lot to nurture the development of your company, and your business skills as a founder. The basic premise is that they’re in the business of investing in startups. An established business person, or group of ‘em, will bring in a company, or group of ‘em, and invest in the company in hopes that it will grow. Most will invest a combination of money, marketing, office space, production and design support, mentorship, and access to their personal networks. They’ll set a pretty rigorous training schedule in business skills, which members are required to go through. In return, they take a piece of your company.

Incubators are typically a long-term involvement, around 2-3 years’ worth, with no set schedule for growth. Most will bring in companies of a similar type into a common working space in hopes that ideas will flourish. Often, incubators will put their own management teams in place – directors and officers – once the grunt work to bring the idea to fruition is complete. Incubators typically take up to 20% of your company for the role they play in incubating your idea.

Accelerators are usually a set business development program to spur rapid growth – hence the name. The program takes place over 3-6 months, and is aimed at companies that have reached a certain stage of development. That program typically involves a couple of “funding rounds” from VC, and may also involve tacking directors and officers of their choosing on to your management team, or full-on replacing the founders in those roles. Accelerators usually take less than 10% of your company for their services.

Who Sails the Ship?

The most value in a growth program is the network that comes along with it. When done right, incubators and accelerators can provide value that’s almost unparalleled. You can get specialized advice and training that will help you to understand and speak the language of business, interpret financial statements, and refine your pitch. Most valuable is the access you get to their well-established business network of advisors, mentors, financiers, and other graduates of their program. That cuts both ways, however. When you climb aboard that train, you’re committing to doing business the way they teach you to do business. While some incubators and accelerators have altruistic intentions, many more are an elaborately constructed way to make money off of your efforts, or to cherry-pick talented business people for their own organizations. It’s a business farm, and you’re the cash crop.

For example, law and accounting firms view successful incubators and accelerators as a way to get new clients. I’m one of them, as an advisor at Ryerson’s DMZ, and a mentor at HumberLaunch. I’ve met several clients that way. Strangely, in the cash strapped world of startups, my competition is largely huge national law firms. These firms will offer cut-rate startup packages, as a loss-leader.  They take a hit on their fees in the short term, in hopes that you’ll grow enough by the time the discount period runs out that you’ll have enough in the bank to pay their rates. That business development strategy means that they’re looking to minimize their short term losses incurred by giving away their services. This can mean standard-form business agreements that aren’t customized to your situation and business. The work is pushed to junior lawyers, law students, and clerks to “cut their teeth” on. A free client’s phone calls are returned after the paying clients’ work is done. That said, big firms have specialized skills, particularly to grow startups into publicly-traded companies, that sole practitioners like me just don’t have. Do your homework.

Dealing with Growth Programs

Moral of the story is, as it was for investors, to know who you’re getting into bed with before signing on the dotted line. Any time you give up equity in your company, you’re taking on a business partner. Like any other partner, you want to make sure that they’ll pull their weight, and know what’s involved in getting yourself out of the deal if need be. The excitement of winning a business plan or pitch competition, or beating out hundreds of other applicants for one of a few positions shouldn’t stop you from doing your due diligence. Here’s some questions to know the answers to before you commit:

  • Who owns the incubator or accelerator?
  • How much of your company do they take, and what conditions are attached?
  • Who are their lawyers, accountants, marketers, and preferred investors? Are you free to choose your own, or do you run with theirs? What’s their interest and relationship?
  • What expectations are there of you?
  • What’s the exit plan? Are they building your company to sell, or take public?
  • Do they have your interests at heart, or do their loyalties lie with the person they have a pre-existing relationship with? What’s the advisor’s interest?
  • Who else have they launched? Did they deliver what was promised? Did their goals shift under the influence of the advisor network? Talk to their “graduates” and grill them on their experience.

Conclusion

Angel investors, venture capital, incubators and accelerators are all tools that are available to help you build your business. As with building anything, it’s important to use the right tool for the job. The right deal is a solid foundation from which to launch your company – you’ll get the mentorship, support, and training to bring your idea to market, build lasting business relationships, and make a bunch of money in the progress. The wrong deal can cram your square peg of a business into the round hole of their interests, and drag you down the long, unpleasant road to failure.

Be strategic. Think about what the end-state will be, when all is said and done. If you’re 100% owner now, and an incubator takes 20%, accelerator takes 10%, and venture capital takes 30%, what does that leave you with? Remember, you’ll be the last to get paid. What if the on-paper value can’t be pulled out for a certain number of years? Is 40% of a $10 million company more valuable to you than 80% of a smaller one? Is your product a flash-in-the-pan, or is it something that will still be relevant when you can cash out? Are you comfortable working with, and being beholden to the people you’re doing business with for that amount of time?

There’s no such thing as certainty in business. That’s what makes it simultaneously frustrating and fun. Do your research, and I strongly strongly strongly recommend getting experience, professional help to review, understand, and negotiate the deal before you sign over part of your company. At the very least, legal, accounting, and ideally an impartial business advisor/investment banker with experience in the types of deals you’re looking at.

After all, “All things will be clear and distinct to the man who does not hurry; haste is blind and improvident.”
– Livy, Ad Urbe Condita Libri, 9 BC

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

Legal Aspects of Business Succession Planning

At long last, I’m celebrating the new year by finishing off this series of succession planning articles. I’ve already talked about the big picture, and how to make sure your business can continue to run if something happens to you. Now it’s time to talk about how you can retire. This isn’t something that should be done in a hurry – it’s wise to give yourself a few months to make the plan and expect it to take years to live out the plan.

There are four main ways that business owners hand over control and operation of small businesses to a successor:

  • Passing the business to a family member,
  • Selling the business to management or employees over time,
  • Selling the business in one fell swoop, or
  • Passing the business in your will (if you want to stick it out ‘til the bitter end…)

Despite the different terms I’m using, all of above except the last are selling the business as far as the tax man sees it. Each of these routes allows you to cash out – or extract the value you’ve built up in the business. Even though the end result of each is similar, the legal path you’ll need to walk to get there is different in each case, with some common elements between them. I’ll talk about each option below. What will work for you depends on what you want, the tax costs, and what is realistic for your business, successor, family, and employees.

Before I dig into the guts of succession, I’ll touch on a few issues that will pop up no matter which way you opt to go – both of them have to do with the almighty dollar.

Valuation

No matter what route you choose, valuing the business will be a pain in the behind. Valuing a business for sale, transfer, or estate purposes can be tricky. As you likely know already, “tricky” is usually lawyer-speak for “expensive,” so brace yourself.

There’s no single formula to value a business. The bigger and more diverse the company, the trickier it is to value. “Tangible assets” – like machinery, inventory, and accounts receivable – are pretty easy to put a price on, while “Intangible assets,” – like client lists, intellectual property, social media influence, or a recognized brand – are more difficult. Equally tough is when you, the owner, are a big part of the business’ worth.

Businesses can be valued by a number of different ways, but the two most common are:

  • Agreement between the buyer and seller
  • Valuation by an accountant, auditor, or certified business valuator

Agreement on price is the cheapest, but the price that you agree to with the buyer might not be the amount that tax is assessed on. You report the sale price, but the CRA will deem the sale to have been made at fair market value. Funnily enough, the CRA rarely finds that the sale happened at a lower value than what was reported. You may end up on the hook for more taxes than you calculated, which cuts into your retirement nest egg.

The CRA and tax courts tend to stick to valuations made by certified business valuators (very expensive), and sometimes accountants (moderately expensive) for tax purposes. Hiring one of those dudes to value your business could cost more than you’re willing to spend… but sometimes the up-front cost of paying a valuator is lower than the potential long-term cost of an extra tax bill. It’s worthwhile to at least have the conversation with your accountant.

Tax Efficiency

Speaking of the CRA, most transfers or sales of businesses can be made cheaper by getting sound accounting advice on how to minimize the tax on the transfer. The more the business is worth, the more likely it is that the transfer will be tax-driven. “Tax-driven” means that your accountant is telling your lawyer how to arrange the purchase and sale so that you (and possibly the buyer) pay the minimum tax possible.

A note of caution on accountants – not all of them know tax. Many small business accountants are good at preparing annual income tax returns, and helping to manage cash flow, but aren’t experts on the tax implications of selling a business. Even if you’ve been with your accountant for years, don’t be afraid to shop around. Moral of the story? Get accounting advice early in the succession planning process.

With that out of the way, here’s the rub:

Four Ways to Transfer Your Business to a Successor

Passing to Family

Selling or passing all or part of the business on to a family member can be a sale, gift, or some combination of the two. There are a number of ways to work this, but what’s best for most small businesses is a gradual transfer of operational control and profit share.

On the operations side, a gradual transfer of responsibility gives your successor a chance to get up to speed on how the business works, build relationships with key customers, advisors, and suppliers, and allows you to pass on the lessons and values you’ve picked up along the way.

As far as profit sharing, if the business’ cash flow can stand it, you may want to continue to draw some sort of income from the company. If not, an incremental buy-out by the next generation or the business itself – usually 5-10% of the value of the business per year – might give you 10-20 years of “income” out of the value you built in the business. That incremental buy-out is usually good for the successor as well, as they don’t have to come up with all the money to buy the company right away. It could also be done as an incremental buy-in, where some of the successor’s pay is in shares, which dilutes your ownership of the company over time.

So long as you own shares in the company, you should consider life insurance. The more your stake is worth, the more this makes sense. Insurance policies pay out directly to the beneficiary – your successor or the company itself – to buy back the shares, and keep those shares out of your estate.

The typical legal documents involved in a family succession include:

  • Unanimous Shareholders’ Agreement – which can set out the terms of any buy-out or buy-in, valuation, insurance, and your continued role in the company, if any. Each shareholder signing it should have independent legal advice.
  • Share Freeze – is a fairly complex transaction where the value of the company “freezes” at a certain date, and you’re issued shares that reflect that frozen value. The successor gets new shares which will capture any further growth in value. The company then buys back the freeze shares over time and cancels them. Your freeze shares could have dividend and voting rights that allow you to continue to share in the profits and management of the company.
  • Trusts – where your shares are managed by someone else on behalf of your successor. These are useful when one or more of your successors doesn’t yet have the age or experience to run the company completely. Trusts are also useful if you’re separating ownership and operations of the business between two or more people.
  • Will – if you pass away before the transfer is complete, you can set out how your shares are to be dealt with. Ensure that the terms of your will match with the terms of any shareholders’ agreement, trust documents, and so forth.
  • Powers of Attorney – if you’re incapacitated before the transfer is complete, who will oversee the management of the company, and manage your shares? Any requirements or restrictions on how the attorney is to act should be set out. This must jive with all the other documents.

On the tax side of things, transfers of property to family members are not at “arm’s length”, and are taxed differently than sales to non-family members.

Selling to Management or Employees

Long-term managers and employees can often feel like family, and a transfer to them can be done much in the same way as to a family member. It can also be done in concert with transfer to a family member – perhaps 51% control of the business will stay in the family, while 49% will go to the employees who will continue to run it. If the employees or managers have the funds available to buy right away, it can be a one-and-done sale, or a phased buy-out or buy-in. These transfers are typically done over 3-5 years, and are “arms-length”, meaning that different tax rules apply than to transfers to family.

Assuming that you’re being bought out, rather than simply giving the shares to the employees, this process will be more formal and legalistic. You should insist that the buyer get independent legal and tax advice so they can’t come back later and say that they didn’t get what they bargained for.

Before writing anything up, you should hash out with the buyer the broad strokes of how the transfer will be structured, and how the buyer will finance the purchase. It can be any combination of:

  • Employee stock option plans – where employees are paid shares as part of their pay, and your ownership and control of the company is diluted over time.
  • Purchase and sale agreement – a contract between the buyer and the seller that sets out all of the key terms of sale. It can include employee stock options, or it can be a straight up purchase of the assets or shares of the company.
  • Shareholders’ agreement – as above.
  • Service agreement – especially if it’s a one-and-done purchase, the buyer may want your services and advice as an employee or independent contractor. They may want you to continue to sit on the board, or to serve as an officer of the company.
  • Indemnity and releases – where the company agrees to protect you for the consequences of legitimate actions you took while a shareholder, officer, or director of the company, and release you from any liability for actions taken after you transferred ownership or control. These are often included in the purchase and sale agreement.

The buyer should conduct due diligence before buying, particularly if you’ve been the one to handle the back-end workings of the business such as dealing with lawyers and accountants. It’s important that the buyer knows what they’re buying, the financial history and projections of the company, and that the books and records are in good order.

Lastly, you’ll want to make sure that your will, trust documents, powers of attorney, and domestic contracts jive with the deal you’ve made.

Selling to Third Parties

If you can’t find anyone in your family or business who’s willing or able to take over from you, it may be time to prepare your business for sale. I won’t go in to too much detail, as I’ll cover sale of business in a separate article, but it will require some legal work to prepare for due diligence.

Due diligence is when the buyer digs through the corporate records to make sure that they know what they’re buying. You should be proactive to make sure that the minute book, employee agreements, accounting records, lists of assets and liabilities, leases, real estate ownership and mortgages, intellectual property, debts, shareholder relations, taxes, and licenses are in good order.

Passing the Business in your Will

Many business owners approach is “I’ll just pass everything in my will.” This is a mixed-bag approach that chooses to duck the costs of preparing and implementing a succession plan, while sacrificing certainty and control.

The upside to this approach is that there’s minimal headache and expense for you in the here and now. It can work very well when your successor is clear – perhaps an only child who’s been working in the company for years, and knows what you know.

The downside is that you may handicap the next generation’s ability to run the company. If the business is asset-rich, but cash-poor, the tax bill on the estate might cripple the company. You will have no control over what happens after you’re gone. Your beneficiary will be stuck with making the tough decisions you’ve abdicated from. It also risks infighting between beneficiaries, or with the company controlled by people who don’t know or care about the business.

I’m not saying leaving the company in your will is a bad decision – just know what risks and benefits you’ll be passing on to your successor before you make the choice.

Phew, that was a long one… I promise I’ll write something more entertaining soon…

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

What is a Joint Venture?

Many folks in business bandy about the words “partnership” and “joint venture”, or even a “JVP” (short for joint venture partnership – a made up term like “Leafs playoff tickets” or “government transparency”), without understanding that partnerships and joint ventures are different legal animals. Though the two have much in common, there are a few important differences that, if not understood from the outset, could affect your work together in strange and not-at-all-wonderful ways. If it walks, talks and acts like a partnership it will likely be treated as one, even if the intention was to create a joint venture. Ergo, it’s important to be clear and precise when creating a co-owned business, in order to avoid unexpected complications with tax, ownership of property, or liability.

What’s the diff?

Partnerships and joint ventures are both agreements to do business together between two or more individuals or corporations, with the goal of making a profit. Both are formed and governed by contract between the parties.

Joint ventures usually are usually used for one-off projects. They’re limited in time and scope – you’re not working together on everything, and they’ll often have an expiry date, which allows parties to renew or eject. They’re particularly useful when you’ll all be putting in different skills and assets, in different quantities. Joint ventures don’t create a separate business entity, and generally are not registered with the government. You work together to the extent that’s agreed to in the contract, and that’s it.

Partnerships, which I talked about in this other article, create an ongoing business relationship through a partnership agreement. Partnerships must be registered as a business entity with the government, and are governed by the rules in the Ontario Partnership Act.

Key terms in the contract

Terms common to both joint ventures and partnerships include:

  • Length of the agreement and conditions for renewal
  • What the business will and will not do
  • What money, assets or skills each party is contributing
  • Share of profits and losses, salaries, and expenses
  • Calculation of profits
  • Duties and responsibilities of each venturer
  • Management structure
  • Indemnity between the venturers
  • Dispute resolution

Terms of a joint venture agreement – or JVA – include:

  • Limits on time or scope of work
  • Termination, including how to divide up assets
  • Ownership of co-created assets and intellectual property
  • Assigning liability for actions of the other venturers
  • Accounting between the venturers, record keeping,
  • Bank accounts, and insurance
  • Division of expenses and revenues

Ownership of property

Ownership of property contributed to a joint venture remains the property of each joint venturer. The party who owns the asset may use it for other purposes without the consent of the joint venture unless it’s otherwise agreed.

Assets contributed to a partnership are considered the property of the partnership and not of the individual partners.

Tax consequences

 Your accountant will care a great deal about this stuff, and the tax consequences of the business structure you choose could be substantial. Make sure to ask before you choose one or the other…

Income Tax

The distribution of profits in both is governed by the agreement. Joint venturers assess their taxes based on their own expenses and share of the revenues from the joint venture. Partners in a partnership are taxed based on the net profits of the partnership. The net profits are distributed to the partners according to their share of the partnership, and taxed at the partners’ normal income tax rate.

The choice between partnership or JV makes a big difference if one party is spending more than the others. In a partnership, a party with higher expenditures would not be able to claim that amount individually.

Capital Cost Allowance

Capital cost allowance is a tax deduction that allows a business to account for the depreciation of capital property. Joint venturers may each claim the capital cost allowance individually to maximize their own tax benefits for the depreciation of the assets they put in to the joint venture. In a partnership, the capital cost allowance claimed must be the same for each partner because only the net profit of the partnership is distributed.

Fiscal Year

Joint venturers report their share of income and losses based on each venturer’s tax year. A partnership will have its own fiscal year end.

Corporate partners in a partnership are required to claim income (but not losses) for the period between the end of the partnership’s tax year and the corporation’s tax year.

Liability

Joint venturers are liable for their own debts and obligations, and can limit their liability based on the joint venture agreement. That way a creditor can’t go after one joint venturer for the debts of the other. The venturers can agree to share responsibility for liabilities taken on in the course of the project, or can split them up however they see fit.

Partners in a partnership, on the other hand, are “jointly and severally liable” for the debts, obligations and misconduct of the partnership and the other partners. “Joint and several liability” is a legal term meaning a creditor can go after the other partners to settle one partner’s debt. The liability can be limited by creating a “Limited Partnership” where a “general partner” takes the excess of any liability that the other partners can’t cover. Each other partner is only on the hook for their own debts or misconduct up to a fixed amount. I’ll get into Limited Partnerships in a different article later.

Both joint ventures and partnerships can agree to assume only their own liability, but there is more risk involved in a partnership if the at-fault partner cannot cover the loss.

Summary

Where two or more parties want to join forces together for a one-off project rather than becoming co-owners of a business, a joint venture is typically the way to go. Whichever business structure is chosen, the choice should be clearly set out in the agreement between all parties involved. Though joint ventures and partnerships may have many characteristics in common, the legal differences between the two warrant taking the time to talk to a lawyer and figure out which structure is right for the business at hand.

I’m indebted to my awesome law student intern, Claudia Dzierbicki, for her work in putting together the guts of this article.

 

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw