Contingency Planning for Small Business

Owning your own business is kind of like giving birth to a needy child. It will fill your days with all manner of excitement, some good, some bad. There also comes a time when you need to start considering what happens to the child if and when you’re not around to take care of it anymore. What happens if you get sick? What if you kick the bucket? What if personal or family problems prevent you from running the business day to day? How the hell are you ever going to retire? None of those things, save perhaps retirement, are pleasant brunch conversation, but they must be had. They’re the first step in making contingency plans. Without such plans, the well-being of your family, employees, and company may be left in limbo – legally, financially, and business-wise. Contingency plans are certainly not decisions that should be made hastily, nor should they be made alone.

This is the first in a series of three articles I’ll be writing on the topic of contingency planning for your small business. This first one will be a general overview of who and what steps are involved in the process. The next two will touch on:

  1. Business continuation planning – if you become sick or incapacitated unexpectedly, and
  2. Business succession planning – how to retire and get the value you grew in the business out of the business.

Goals

Each business owner will have a different view of what they want out of “retired” life, but there are a few overarching goals that should be built into any succession plan:

  1. to make a smooth transition to a successor;
  2. to see the business in good hands going forward; and
  3. to have financial security in retirement or during illness or incapacity.

Timeline

When I say not to make the decision hastily, I mean it. There are a bunch of hard decisions that you’ll need to make. Your decisions will affect the people you care about the most – friends, family, employees, collaborators, customers/clients, suppliers, and so on.

For business continuation planning, give yourself a couple of months to put the plan together. This will give you time to have those tough discussions, get meaningful feedback and advice, gather the appropriate information, and get all the paperwork done. You want to ensure that the plan you’ve made is feasible, and will work even if the worst case scenario happens. You may also have to start training your staff to do what you do, which can take considerable time as well.

For business succession, allow several months to make the plan, and at least 3-5 years to ease the plan into effect. All of the same steps for business continuation planning apply here, but with a different end-game. So, if you’re a baby boomer who’s looking to make a slow, graceful exit from the business, the time to start planning is now…

Who’s involved?

It’s one thing to decide who you want to carry the flag for you, and another thing altogether for them to want to pick it up and run with it. There are two rounds of consultation to do – one with those affected by the plan, the other with the advisers that will help you piece it together.

In the first round of talks, you’re trying to figure out who’s willing and able to take over the business. At the end of the day, it’s up to you and your co-owners to choose, but I pity the fool who tries to pass their affairs on to someone who doesn’t care to take over, or doesn’t have the ability to run the business effectively. The folks you should talk to include:

  • Family members – particularly your spouse, children, and others who could be beneficiaries in your will
  • Business partners/co-owners/other shareholders
  • Friends with an interest in the business
  • Managers and senior employees
  • Major creditors

After those talks, you should have a pretty good idea of who’s willing to take over, what knowledge gaps need to be filled to get them ready to do your job should you not be able to. Then it’s up to you and your co-owners to choose who will take over, and when.

Once you’ve got a plan, it’s time to figure out how to put it into action. This is where your advisers earn their keep. You should talk to your:

  • Tax planning accountant**
  • Lawyer
  • Insurance agent
  • Banker, and
  • Major creditors

I put two of these bad boys – ** – next to the tax planning accountant for a reason. Many small businesses have an accountant who does their books and prepares tax returns each year. This accountant may be great, but they’re not necessarily a tax planning expert. A CA who focuses on tax planning can help you to get your money out of the business with minimal taxes. Your accountant will take the lead in planning how it’s to be done, your lawyer will do the grunt work to set up all of the structures, and your insurance agent will help you figure out how it’ll all get paid for.

The People Factor

As you well know by now, a successful business is only as good as the people who run it. If your business is doing well enough to prompt you to make contingency plans, then it’s also doing well enough for you to start grooming your employees to take more responsibility in it. When the employees are running a bigger piece of the company, you’re able to phase out gradually. This means training them to do what you do, allowing them to make mistakes and correct them, and developing their leadership skills. This learning curve may take years, so start doing it right away.

There’s a saying in the army that “no plan survives first contact with the enemy”, meaning that every plan looks great on paper, but things rarely ever go according to plan. It’s wise to build contingencies into your contingencies. Pick more than one worthy successor, or have more than one option. That way if your #1 choice jumps at a different opportunity, falls ill, or turns out not to have the leadership skills needed to take the business forward, you’re not up a fecal watercourse with no means of mechanical locomotion.

Conclusion

This was a very brief overview of the contingency planning process. In the next article, which you can find here, I’ll dive a little deeper into business continuation planning, and some of the legal stuff that’s involved in it.

If you’re looking for a more in-depth discussion of contingency planning, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business has an excellent guide up for free. The Government of Canada has published a quick online guide, and most banks and insurance companies have similar publications.

See you again soon!

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

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What is a Joint Venture?

Many folks in business bandy about the words “partnership” and “joint venture”, or even a “JVP” (short for joint venture partnership – a made up term like “Leafs playoff tickets” or “government transparency”), without understanding that partnerships and joint ventures are different legal animals. Though the two have much in common, there are a few important differences that, if not understood from the outset, could affect your work together in strange and not-at-all-wonderful ways. If it walks, talks and acts like a partnership it will likely be treated as one, even if the intention was to create a joint venture. Ergo, it’s important to be clear and precise when creating a co-owned business, in order to avoid unexpected complications with tax, ownership of property, or liability.

What’s the diff?

Partnerships and joint ventures are both agreements to do business together between two or more individuals or corporations, with the goal of making a profit. Both are formed and governed by contract between the parties.

Joint ventures usually are usually used for one-off projects. They’re limited in time and scope – you’re not working together on everything, and they’ll often have an expiry date, which allows parties to renew or eject. They’re particularly useful when you’ll all be putting in different skills and assets, in different quantities. Joint ventures don’t create a separate business entity, and generally are not registered with the government. You work together to the extent that’s agreed to in the contract, and that’s it.

Partnerships, which I talked about in this other article, create an ongoing business relationship through a partnership agreement. Partnerships must be registered as a business entity with the government, and are governed by the rules in the Ontario Partnership Act.

Key terms in the contract

Terms common to both joint ventures and partnerships include:

  • Length of the agreement and conditions for renewal
  • What the business will and will not do
  • What money, assets or skills each party is contributing
  • Share of profits and losses, salaries, and expenses
  • Calculation of profits
  • Duties and responsibilities of each venturer
  • Management structure
  • Indemnity between the venturers
  • Dispute resolution

Terms of a joint venture agreement – or JVA – include:

  • Limits on time or scope of work
  • Termination, including how to divide up assets
  • Ownership of co-created assets and intellectual property
  • Assigning liability for actions of the other venturers
  • Accounting between the venturers, record keeping,
  • Bank accounts, and insurance
  • Division of expenses and revenues

Ownership of property

Ownership of property contributed to a joint venture remains the property of each joint venturer. The party who owns the asset may use it for other purposes without the consent of the joint venture unless it’s otherwise agreed.

Assets contributed to a partnership are considered the property of the partnership and not of the individual partners.

Tax consequences

 Your accountant will care a great deal about this stuff, and the tax consequences of the business structure you choose could be substantial. Make sure to ask before you choose one or the other…

Income Tax

The distribution of profits in both is governed by the agreement. Joint venturers assess their taxes based on their own expenses and share of the revenues from the joint venture. Partners in a partnership are taxed based on the net profits of the partnership. The net profits are distributed to the partners according to their share of the partnership, and taxed at the partners’ normal income tax rate.

The choice between partnership or JV makes a big difference if one party is spending more than the others. In a partnership, a party with higher expenditures would not be able to claim that amount individually.

Capital Cost Allowance

Capital cost allowance is a tax deduction that allows a business to account for the depreciation of capital property. Joint venturers may each claim the capital cost allowance individually to maximize their own tax benefits for the depreciation of the assets they put in to the joint venture. In a partnership, the capital cost allowance claimed must be the same for each partner because only the net profit of the partnership is distributed.

Fiscal Year

Joint venturers report their share of income and losses based on each venturer’s tax year. A partnership will have its own fiscal year end.

Corporate partners in a partnership are required to claim income (but not losses) for the period between the end of the partnership’s tax year and the corporation’s tax year.

Liability

Joint venturers are liable for their own debts and obligations, and can limit their liability based on the joint venture agreement. That way a creditor can’t go after one joint venturer for the debts of the other. The venturers can agree to share responsibility for liabilities taken on in the course of the project, or can split them up however they see fit.

Partners in a partnership, on the other hand, are “jointly and severally liable” for the debts, obligations and misconduct of the partnership and the other partners. “Joint and several liability” is a legal term meaning a creditor can go after the other partners to settle one partner’s debt. The liability can be limited by creating a “Limited Partnership” where a “general partner” takes the excess of any liability that the other partners can’t cover. Each other partner is only on the hook for their own debts or misconduct up to a fixed amount. I’ll get into Limited Partnerships in a different article later.

Both joint ventures and partnerships can agree to assume only their own liability, but there is more risk involved in a partnership if the at-fault partner cannot cover the loss.

Summary

Where two or more parties want to join forces together for a one-off project rather than becoming co-owners of a business, a joint venture is typically the way to go. Whichever business structure is chosen, the choice should be clearly set out in the agreement between all parties involved. Though joint ventures and partnerships may have many characteristics in common, the legal differences between the two warrant taking the time to talk to a lawyer and figure out which structure is right for the business at hand.

I’m indebted to my awesome law student intern, Claudia Dzierbicki, for her work in putting together the guts of this article.

 

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

New Anti-Spam Law and your Small Business

For almost every small business, Canada’s new anti-spam law will be a game changer. Unfortunately the changed game will be tedious and more expensive for most of you. It started out as a law to stop people and companies from spamming Canadians with unwanted messages. The way the law turned out, however, is using a hand grenade to get a squirrel out of your bird feeder. It will have a huge impact on the way your company can do its business online.

ImageThe law covers almost any electronic messages you send for business purposes – including email, text messages, and direct messages on social media, but not phone or fax. The basic premise of the law is that businesses must get the recipient’s consent before sending business messages to them. Simple enough, right?

The rest of the law is a rats-nest of exceptions, conditions, and legal grey areas. This blog will map out said rats-nest, without taking too much of the magic out of what I do. Practically speaking, your two main concerns are getting consent to send messages to the recipient, and having the right content in the message itself. That’s what this blog will focus on.

The penalties for businesses that ignore or break this law can reach up to $10,000,000, so it’s kind of a big deal. It’s also an offence to aid someone in breaking this law – so social media marketers, IT, and CRM dudes, beware!

The law will come into effect in three phases:

  • Most parts of the law will be in force on July 1, 2014
  • Parts dealing with the unsolicited installation of computer programs – January 15, 2015
  • Right for individuals to sue for damages caused by spammers – July 1, 2017

In this blog, I’m only going to talk about the parts of the law that come into force this year.

 

 1. Consent

The recipient must actively and voluntarily give consent to you sending them business messages. This consent can be express or implied – which I’ll tackle below. You don’t need consent:

  • from friends and family
  • from employees, representatives, consultants or franchisees of your organization
  • from foreign recipients – though your message must comply with that jurisdiction’s anti-spam laws
  • if you’re
    • answering an inquiry, request, or complaint
    • giving notice of a legal right or obligation
    • giving them factual information about an ongoing relationship like a subscription, membership, or loan
    • providing information about an employment relationship or benefit plan that they’re in
    • delivering updates or upgrades
    • a charity or political party
  • if the message is solely an inquiry about the products or services the recipient provides

 Express Consent

This is when the recipient takes a positive action to approve of you sending them business messages. Once given, express consent remains valid until withdrawn. More on withdrawal below. The guts of express consent are:

  • The message or form asking for consent must:
    • explain why you’re asking for consent
    • give the name of the organization or person seeking consent (or identify who you’re getting consent for, if it’s not you)
    • give valid contact information – including at least one non-electronic means
    • let them know they can unsubscribe at any time
  • If consent was expressly given before this new law, you don’t have to go back and re-confirm
  • The recipient must “opt in” (as in, checking a box), rather than opt out (unchecking a box), or the consent isn’t valid
  • Keep a record of who consented, when, and how – as it’s up to you to show that you got it, not the other way around

 Implied Consent

This is a little trickier, as most types of implied consent have an expiry date. Express consent is more practical for you to get, because it doesn’t expire, and is easier for you to keep track of. That said, if your contacts aren’t big on clicking through links in email, implied consent may still cover you. Implied consent can be found:

  • in an existing business relationship, meaning that you and the recipient have
    • in the past two years,
      • bought, sold, or leased goods, services or land from each other
      • were bound by a written contract with each other
      • bartered goods, services or land with each other, or
    • in the past six months, made an inquiry about doing any of the above
  • an existing non-business relationship
  • if the recipient has published or disclosed their email address, they have not stated that they don’t wish to receive unsolicited messages, and the message is relevant to their business or role

 

2. Content

So once you’ve got consent from all of your adoring fans, and you’re dutifully keeping accurate records of who has consented, your work is still not done. From July 1, 2014 onwards, every business message you send must have certain content, except messages

  • to recipients you have a personal or family relationship with, or
  • which are an inquiry about the business products or services the recipient provides

All of your business messages must contain information that:

  • identifies the sender, or on whose behalf it’s sent
  • sets out contact information for the sender, including at least one non-electronic means
  • has a way to unsubscribe or withdraw consent

The unsubscribe mechanism must:

  • operate at no cost to the recipient
  • allow the recipient to unsubscribe by the same means the message was sent, or give another electronic means to unsubscribe
  • give a link to a webpage that allows them to unsubscribe

Once they unsubscribe, you’ve got 10 business days to take their name off the list, or else.

 

3. Conclusion

Like I said, game changer… though how it changes the game will differ from business to business. There are a few best practices that I’d recommend you start implementing now:

  • Vet your contact lists now to determine who you will need consent from
  • Before July 1, 2014, send a message to your existing mailing lists asking them to opt in, and create a new mailing list of those who do
  • After July 1, 2014, you’ll have to get consent the old fashioned way – by mail, phone, or other non-electronic means
  • Keep records of information showing consent
  • Put together a new email signature that meets the content requirements
  • Build an “unsubscribe” link into your website, and make sure the unsubscribe mechanism works

Most IT service providers should be CASL-compliant by now, and companies like my friends at Response Magic have developed simple and thorough systems to help you colour within the lines. Of course, every business and every situation is different, and applying a general rule is no substitution for consultation with an intrepid lawyer. You know where to reach me if you’ve got questions.

There. I just saved you $10,000,000. You can thank me later.

 

 

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

Incorporating an Existing Business

I’ve talked about the pros and cons of different business structures in an earlier article, but what happens when you start out as a sole proprietor or in a partnership, and later want to incorporate? The transition needs to be seamless, so that the corporation can step right in to your shoes and carry on business.

This is something I deal with regularly, and unfortunately it’s not a simple process. It’s difficult for a layman to do without some professional advice from your lawyer, and accountant or tax nerd. The details count here – to the point that writing this blog post took about 8 hours of work. Doing it the wrong way could lead to paying unexpected taxes, interest and penalties, muddy the water about who owns business assets, and stick you with personal liability for things that you thought were pushed over to the corporation. Fear not, intrepid entrepreneur – there’s a way through the maze

OK, what’s so friggin’ complicated?

There are three steps to incorporating an existing business:

  1. Incorporation and organization of a new company;
  2. Sale of the business or partnership to the corporation; and
  3. Joint election to defer the paying of capital gains tax.

Each step has its quirks, which I’ll explain below. There are a bunch of other business steps that you should take to make the transition seamless – this handy dandy checklist should help. Every case will be different – but at least you can get an idea of the key tasks. The rest of the article deals with the process on the legal side. Let’s git ‘r done:

1. Incorporation

Take the usual steps to incorporate your company –name search, and filing of the articles of incorporation with the fee payable to the Ministry. If you’ve registered your existing business’ name, and want to use a similar name for the new corporation, you’ll have to file a signed letter, or completed consent form with the articles of incorporation. You may want to include a share price adjustment clause in the articles of incorporation, in case the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) puts a different value on the sale than you did.

The value of the shares that you’ll own will depend on the sale price. It’s important that the numbers add up, and are consistent between the sale agreement, the documents in the corporation’s minute book, and the election to defer the capital gains tax that you file.

2. Selling the Business:  Tax Rollover

Once your corporation is all set up, it is a “person” (and a taxpayer) in the eyes of the law. It can own property, enter into contracts, and do all that other fun stuff that you do for work. The problem is that the corporation doesn’t actually own anything yet, or have a right to take over your business. You own the corporation, and you also own the assets of the existing business, but they’re different people entirely. In order to merge the two, you’ve got to sell your sole proprietorship to your corporation.

The CRA will want you to pay capital gains tax on the sale. When you started your business, it was worthless. Through your hard work, it has grown in value – accumulating cash, equipment, inventory, contracts, real estate, etc. – which is a capital gain. When you sell the business, the capital gain is realized, and 50% of that amount will be added to your personal income as capital gains tax.

As pleasant as that sounds, you’re allowed to put off payment of the capital gains tax. Since you’re actually only selling the business back to yourself – you’re still are the beneficial owner of the business through your shares of the corporation – you’re not actually realizing the capital gain. You still have to pay it when you actually sell the business to someone else – but you can avoid it for now. This is known as a “tax rollover”. Lawyers, accountants, and various other nerds call this “deferring the realization of a capital gain”. Bottom line is you’ll have more money left to keep your business afloat.

To defer the capital gain, you must sell the business to the corporation at fair market value, in exchange for shares of the corporation. This is done with a “Section 85(1) Rollover Agreement”, which is a contract of sale between you and the corporation. You keep a copy, and a copy goes in the corporation’s minute book. Having a clear agreement on file is very important – the CRA likes to scrutinize these types of sales closely in order to head off tax evasion.

There are two main parts to the rollover agreement – the sale contract, and the financial terms – mostly the value of the assets, and the shares they’re being exchanged for. The sale contract should cover the following points:

  • Agreement to buy and sell
  • Shares and other compensation issued in return
  • Agreement to make a joint election to defer the capital gain under Section 85 of the Income Tax Act
  • Price adjustment clause – in case the CRA decides that the value of the assets is different than you say it is
  • Representations and warranties – that you and the corporation have the legal capacity to buy and sell the assets
  • General provisions – about how the contract is to be interpreted, and so forth

You can find examples on the interweb – Appendix A or B of this article here is a good starting point – though I don’t recommend trying to do this without legal and tax advice. The consequences of screwing it up could cripple your business if you don’t have the cash to pay the tax bill.

The financial terms – usually laid out in a table as an attachment to the contract – can get tricky. The CRA deems the assets of the business to be sold at fair market value. Some assets – especially goodwill – are hard to value. Others have depreciated or grown in value since you got them. Other assets might have a constant value, or cost nothing to acquire, but still generate income. The same goes for liabilities – though typically you don’t transfer many, if any, liabilities in these sales. You should get your accountant to value the assets, and determine the sale price of each class – or the “Elected Amount”. In the contract, you can set a price for each “class of assets” as a group, rather than breaking it down for each item. Still, your accountant should keep the working papers used to determine the amounts declared, in case the CRA asks for justification.

Typically, the following classes of assets will be sold:

  • Non-Depreciable Capital property
    • Some securities or investments
    • Some real estate
    • Trademarks
    • Some patents
  • Depreciable property – property with a definite useful life
    • Furniture, equipment, electronics, tools, spare parts
    • Vehicles and accessories
    • Buildings and the systems in them (HVAC, plumbing, electrical, etc)
    • Fixtures
  • Eligible capital property
    • Goodwill – reputation, customer lists, business name
    • Some securities or investments
    • Incorporation costs
    • Some patents
    • Non-real estate inventory

 3. Joint Election

No, I don’t mean the big issue in the next Federal campaign. It’s actually just more paperwork. Once the rollover agreement is all done and signed, the final step to deferring the capital gain is to file an “Election on Disposition of Property by a Taxpayer to a Taxable Canadian Corporation.”

This riveting document is the CRA’s Form T2057. It uses much of the same information from the rollover agreement. It’s best to get your accountant to help you fill it out. The CRA will scrutinize the rollover closely. If you screw it up, you can amend the election form, but you can’t revoke an election once it’s filed.

Conclusion

That’s a lot of stuff to deal with for what seems like it should be a simple process. I strongly recommend that you don’t try this at home. It’s a tax-driven transaction – which means that your accountant should be calling the shots on the financial terms, and your lawyer should be papering the details. It’s usually a modest legal and accounting bill, which can protect you from an ugly capital gains tax bill, and the interest and penalties that come with it. Lawyer up!

Good luck out there!

 

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

How do I structure my business?

One of the most common questions I get from entrepreneurs at networking events is how to structure their business. Actually, the conversation usually starts with a question about whether or not I “do incorporations” (the answer is yes, btw). It seems most people have an idea that there are advantages to incorporating, even if they don’t understand what the advantages may be.

The short answer is yes, there are some advantages to incorporating, but there are many ways to skin the business structure cat. Before you make up your mind that the corporate form is right for you, you should know what your other options are, and what some of the advantages and disadvantages are.

So, without further ado, here are three of the most common business structures in Ontario:

The Corporation

When you incorporate, you’re birthing a separate “legal person” that has many of the same rights and responsibilities as an actual person. It can enter into contracts, borrow money, sue and be sued, pay taxes, and even has some rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It is owned by its shareholders, and run by its directors and officers.

The biggest advantage of incorporation is “limited liability” – meaning that if someone has a legal dispute with a corporation that you own, your personal exposure isn’t more than the assets you’ve invested in the company. (This isn’t true 100% of the time – see this article on director & officer liability). Another advantage is that the corporate tax rate is much lower than the individual tax rate. A good accountant can work with your lawyer to set the business up in a way that minimizes your business and personal tax costs.

Other advantages:

  • It continues to exist even if the shareholders, officers or directors move on or pass away.
  • Ownership can be sold or transferred in whole or in part.
  • Easy to raise money (capital) by selling shares or options for shares.
  • There are clear rules on the roles of the people who control and operate the company.
  • Corporations can be shareholders (owners) of other corporations, which can further protect the people who ultimately own the companies from liability.

Disadvantages:

  • Extensive record keeping and annual reporting requirements to the government.
  • More involved process to take money out of the corporation to pay yourself.
  • Possible disputes between shareholders and management.
  • Higher startup costs than other business structures.

Well Suited For:

Industries with more risk of being sued, that are more likely to need outside money to grow, and where hiring employees or contractors to run parts of the business is likely, such as:

  • Manufacturing
  • Retail, bars & restaurants
  • Construction & landscaping
  • Resources
  • Transportation, tourism & adventure
  • Tech services and support

A corporation is a very flexible business structure that, if set up correctly in the first place, can grow and change with your business as it evolves. If you’re considering setting up shop as a corporation, give me a call, and we can make sure we get it done right.

The Sole Proprietor

This isn’t much more than you registering a business name, and starting to do business. You and the business are the same person for legal and tax purposes, so anyone who is owed a debt by the business could claim against your house, car, or personal savings to get it paid back.

Advantages:

  • Simplicity
  • Very little startup cost
  • Little government regulation
  • You have direct control of decision making
  • Business losses can be deducted from your personal income

Disadvantages:

  • Your personal assets may be at risk.
  • Higher tax rate on business income means there’s less to reinvest in the business.
  • Banks and other lenders may be less willing to make loans.

Well suited for:

Low-risk industries, remote/virtual workers, consultants, and services for individuals rather than businesses, such as:

  • Social media
  • Personal training
  • Bookkeeping
  • Professional services and other consultants
  • RMTs
  • Web design

A sole proprietorship is a cheap and easy way to get your business off the ground. It’s not particularly flexible, or well suited for long-term growth, but it’s not difficult to incorporate a business later once you’re ready to grow, hire, rent space, and enter into contracts with suppliers and customers.

The Partnerships

A partnership is an agreement, typically in writing, between two or more people (or corporations) to carry on business together for mutual gain. You pool your resources, and share in the profits or losses according to your agreement. No separate legal person is created – so creditors can still look to the partners’ personal assets to satisfy debts owed by the partnership. Partnership income is paid out to the partners, and you’re each taxed at your individual rate.

Limited Liability Partnerships are ones in which the other partners aren’t liable for the debts or claims against one of the partners. Law firms and accounting practices commonly use this form.

Limited Partnerships ones where all partners own the assets of the business, but certain partners limit their liability to the value of their contribution to the partnership. At least one of the partners must be a general partner, with no limited liability.

Advantages

  • Simple to start up.
  • Very flexible, and can allow each partner to keep control of their portion of the business
  • Few ongoing formalities such as annual meetings
  • Business losses can be deducted from your personal income.
  • Costs and profits are shared between the partners

Disadvantages

  • Your personal assets may be at risk
  • You are legally and financially responsible for business decisions made by your partner – such as entering in to bad contracts, or breaking them
  • Income is taxed at your personal rate
  • Possibility of conflict between partners
  • Higher start-up cost, as all partners should have independent legal advice in negotiating and drafting the partnership agreement.

Well Suited For:

Diverse groups of professionals working towards a common goal (pooling resources), people cooperating on short-term projects, and projects in exploratory or preliminary phases in:

  • Professional services – accounting, architecture, real estate, medicine, incubators/accelerators
  • Industrial or real estate development
  • Mining projects
  • Arts, theatrical and film ventures
  • Medical, scientific and technology research

Since a partnership is a private agreement between the partners, it can be adapted to suit just about any relationship. If you’re considering entering in to a partnership, you should have legal advice to make sure that you know what you’re agreeing to, and that your interests are protected. More information on partnership agreements is coming soon.

Hopefully this article helps you to understand what your options are, and gives you an idea of how to get your business off the ground. I’m happy to discuss these options with you, and help you get your business set up for long-term success.

 

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
mike@intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw