Beware the Entrepreneurship Industry

This may be a controversial post. You’ve been warned. This post is from my point of view as an advisor to small business. I realize that I occupy a place in the “industry” landscape, and that like the bigger wheels in the machine, I too turn a profit from providing services to small business. As a lawyer, however, I have a duty of loyalty to my clients – called a fiduciary duty. It isn’t optional, it’s the law. This means a bunch of things – to be competent and diligent in my work, to act in my clients’ best interest, honesty, and to keep your information confidential. Most of the other people you’ll come in contact with in the business world don’t have such a duty – and therein lies the risk that we call “doing business.”

I’ll get to the point.

I’ve noticed a trend towards the industrialization of entrepreneurship these days, and the more I think about it, the less comfortable I am with it. When I say “industry”, I’m talking about making labour systematic. The same business model that created the assembly line to make business more “economically efficient” is now being applied to entrepreneurship. There’s big money to be made. Investors and big business have realized that in many cases it’s more economically efficient to buy innovation than to innovate.

But how do you groom small, innovative businesses into ones that will slip neatly into the world of big business, and global financial markets as they grow? The answer is to industrialize entrepreneurship. As this system gains momentum, there’s an explosion of organizations which provide ready-made solutions to most of your small business needs.

Most of these organizations exist to make money….

… off of you…

… and none of them owe you a duty of loyalty.

I’m not saying that these organizations are out to get you. There are plenty of amazing collaborators out there. All I’m saying is that a healthy dose of caution, and an unhealthy dose research before getting into bed with them is in order. Any time you give up equity (shares) in your company it’s like taking on a business partner. They invest time, money, and resources in making your company grow. With the money comes the expectation of profit. You, as the one with the business or idea, will want to be assured that your partners will pull their weight, and that you’ll have a way out if they don’t. In return, there are some pretty thick strings attached to the investment. They’re gamblers in a way. Gamblers with a much bigger stack than you, more experience in these kinds of deals, and an uncanny ability to lawyer plucky little startups into the ground if they feel wronged. Choosing the wrong horse to hitch your wagon to could cost you your business.

In this article, I’ll talk about two of the big growth sectors in the entrepreneurship industry – high risk investors, and growth programs. I’ll deal with high risk investors first – angel investors and venture capital. Then I’ll move on to the growth programs – incubators and accelerators.

High Risk Investors

The starting point to understanding high risk investors is to understand the basic business proposition from the investor’s point of view. Angel investors, and to a greater extent, venture capital, are betting on the success of your business. In return, they demand returns commensurate with that level of risk. Particularly for VC, they may invest in ten companies, and only get a return on one – meaning the one that hits, they’ve got to make all the money back that they invested in all ten, plus a healthy profit margin – otherwise they’ll be out of business. That means they’re going to do almost everything in their power to make sure that they get their money back. This includes attaching strict, investor-friendly terms to the financing. This also includes using their networks and contacts to spur growth. They’re putting a lot of eggs in your basket, and approach the deal accordingly.

Angels

An angel investor is a wealthy person or group of investors who are willing to pony up startup capital for businesses that they think will succeed. Some angels specialize in raw startups, while others are only interested in companies that have already reached a certain critical mass. While the term “angel” might make them seem benevolent, they’re planning on making money off of your work. Their investment buys a part of your company – between 10-50% typically – and often gives the investor a say in how the business is run. They think they can make money on your idea – and if you don’t do it for them, they may take the reins and do it themselves. Angels see the end-game too, where they can realize the return on their investment. Cashing in. This often means selling the business – either to a third party or by taking the company public. If your end game is different, you may have found the wrong angel. If selling isn’t their goal, they might intend to grow your company in a way that benefits their other business interests.

Angel investment is attractive because as soon as they’re on board, it’s in the angel’s interest to use their connections and experience to help the business. A good angel can open up supply or sales channels that were previously out of reach, guide you through tough negotiations, and provide mentorship to help you develop your business skills. On the other hand, an angel whose intentions aren’t so angelic could take control of the business, fire you, and force you to sell them your shares at a discount. If they have a bad reputation in the business community, you could be tainted with that as well. I’ve seen all of these things and more. Do your homework, and get advice before, during, and after negotiations with angel investors.

Venture Capital

Venture capital is a different beast altogether. VC is usually a fund where many professional investors, serial entrepreneurs, large companies with innovation budgets pool their money together. The fund is managed by specialists who look for high-growth, high-potential businesses to invest in. Usually they’re looking for an “adolescent” business, rather than a raw startup, will invest for several years, and expect a return of around 10 times what they invested over that time. VC will usually get paid out first – often within 1-2 years – and take a percentage of ownership of the company. Venture capital is usually a one-way ticket to an initial public offering, and your investors will do what they must to ensure they get a return. They’ll appoint board members to shepherd their investment, and often have a good deal of say in hiring for key positions. They may replace you as the CEO if they have someone who’ll do better. The investment will usually be a high-interest loan, and secured with shares in the company which will pay the VC back first if the company goes belly-up. The exit plan almost always involves taking the company public. VC is more complex than that – but the important take-away here is that it’s very, very pricey money.

VC is attractive because, if it works, you get rich when the company is sold or taken public. VCs will lend based on their valuation of the idea, rather than their ability to secure their investment on the assets of the company, like a bank would. The downside is, once the VC comes on board, the business ceases to be your baby. Your interests aren’t aligned – the VC is looking out for their investment, not for the best interests of you, the company, or the employees. Most venture capital funds focus on building up the pool of money they manage, rather than mentoring and guiding the business – they’ll often appoint outside board members to represent their interests. The strings attached are large, and tied tightly.

Dealing with High Risk Investors

High risk investors can take your business to the next level in a hurry, and are sometimes the only viable option to fund your research and development. This is especially true for businesses built on ideas, rather than physical assets. Be very, very careful about who you’re dealing with, and understand the deal that you’re making before you sign on the dotted line. Do your research. Get legal and accounting advice. Shop around, and keep these in mind when you’re exploring your options:

  • First, foremost, and always remember – if they’re willing to fund you, then you have something they want. You have leverage in negotiations, and should only take a deal that works for your company.
  • What’s the business/industry background of the people you’re dealing with? What other companies have they worked with, and what results did they get? Talk to those companies, and get a no-bullshit assessment.
  • Who will be appointed to your board? How many other boards do they serve on?
  • Who are their advisors – accounting, legal, etc – and do they come as a package deal? Are they encouraging you to get independent advice before signing?
  • What’s their exit plan? Does it mesh with your vision for the business?

If the investor can’t give you a good answer to those questions, or stands in the way of you finding the answers on your own, run away as fast as you can.

Predatory investors can be hard to spot… until it’s too late. I’ve got a bunch of horror stories from people in my network who jumped at what looked like a good deal… and when they landed, the investor owned the company, and the founder ended up with only a fraction of the value they’d built. They’re smart people who make their living by getting other people to do the grunt work for them… and unscrupulous investors know how to cover their bases. Be cautious, and put in the time and effort to understand them, their goals, and what they expect of you before committing.

Growth Programs

Incubators & Accelerators

These two get lumped together because they fulfill roughly the same role at different stages of a company’s growth. They are, at their core, great business models, and can do a whole lot to nurture the development of your company, and your business skills as a founder. The basic premise is that they’re in the business of investing in startups. An established business person, or group of ‘em, will bring in a company, or group of ‘em, and invest in the company in hopes that it will grow. Most will invest a combination of money, marketing, office space, production and design support, mentorship, and access to their personal networks. They’ll set a pretty rigorous training schedule in business skills, which members are required to go through. In return, they take a piece of your company.

Incubators are typically a long-term involvement, around 2-3 years’ worth, with no set schedule for growth. Most will bring in companies of a similar type into a common working space in hopes that ideas will flourish. Often, incubators will put their own management teams in place – directors and officers – once the grunt work to bring the idea to fruition is complete. Incubators typically take up to 20% of your company for the role they play in incubating your idea.

Accelerators are usually a set business development program to spur rapid growth – hence the name. The program takes place over 3-6 months, and is aimed at companies that have reached a certain stage of development. That program typically involves a couple of “funding rounds” from VC, and may also involve tacking directors and officers of their choosing on to your management team, or full-on replacing the founders in those roles. Accelerators usually take less than 10% of your company for their services.

Who Sails the Ship?

The most value in a growth program is the network that comes along with it. When done right, incubators and accelerators can provide value that’s almost unparalleled. You can get specialized advice and training that will help you to understand and speak the language of business, interpret financial statements, and refine your pitch. Most valuable is the access you get to their well-established business network of advisors, mentors, financiers, and other graduates of their program. That cuts both ways, however. When you climb aboard that train, you’re committing to doing business the way they teach you to do business. While some incubators and accelerators have altruistic intentions, many more are an elaborately constructed way to make money off of your efforts, or to cherry-pick talented business people for their own organizations. It’s a business farm, and you’re the cash crop.

For example, law and accounting firms view successful incubators and accelerators as a way to get new clients. I’m one of them, as an advisor at Ryerson’s DMZ, and a mentor at HumberLaunch. I’ve met several clients that way. Strangely, in the cash strapped world of startups, my competition is largely huge national law firms. These firms will offer cut-rate startup packages, as a loss-leader.  They take a hit on their fees in the short term, in hopes that you’ll grow enough by the time the discount period runs out that you’ll have enough in the bank to pay their rates. That business development strategy means that they’re looking to minimize their short term losses incurred by giving away their services. This can mean standard-form business agreements that aren’t customized to your situation and business. The work is pushed to junior lawyers, law students, and clerks to “cut their teeth” on. A free client’s phone calls are returned after the paying clients’ work is done. That said, big firms have specialized skills, particularly to grow startups into publicly-traded companies, that sole practitioners like me just don’t have. Do your homework.

Dealing with Growth Programs

Moral of the story is, as it was for investors, to know who you’re getting into bed with before signing on the dotted line. Any time you give up equity in your company, you’re taking on a business partner. Like any other partner, you want to make sure that they’ll pull their weight, and know what’s involved in getting yourself out of the deal if need be. The excitement of winning a business plan or pitch competition, or beating out hundreds of other applicants for one of a few positions shouldn’t stop you from doing your due diligence. Here’s some questions to know the answers to before you commit:

  • Who owns the incubator or accelerator?
  • How much of your company do they take, and what conditions are attached?
  • Who are their lawyers, accountants, marketers, and preferred investors? Are you free to choose your own, or do you run with theirs? What’s their interest and relationship?
  • What expectations are there of you?
  • What’s the exit plan? Are they building your company to sell, or take public?
  • Do they have your interests at heart, or do their loyalties lie with the person they have a pre-existing relationship with? What’s the advisor’s interest?
  • Who else have they launched? Did they deliver what was promised? Did their goals shift under the influence of the advisor network? Talk to their “graduates” and grill them on their experience.

Conclusion

Angel investors, venture capital, incubators and accelerators are all tools that are available to help you build your business. As with building anything, it’s important to use the right tool for the job. The right deal is a solid foundation from which to launch your company – you’ll get the mentorship, support, and training to bring your idea to market, build lasting business relationships, and make a bunch of money in the progress. The wrong deal can cram your square peg of a business into the round hole of their interests, and drag you down the long, unpleasant road to failure.

Be strategic. Think about what the end-state will be, when all is said and done. If you’re 100% owner now, and an incubator takes 20%, accelerator takes 10%, and venture capital takes 30%, what does that leave you with? Remember, you’ll be the last to get paid. What if the on-paper value can’t be pulled out for a certain number of years? Is 40% of a $10 million company more valuable to you than 80% of a smaller one? Is your product a flash-in-the-pan, or is it something that will still be relevant when you can cash out? Are you comfortable working with, and being beholden to the people you’re doing business with for that amount of time?

There’s no such thing as certainty in business. That’s what makes it simultaneously frustrating and fun. Do your research, and I strongly strongly strongly recommend getting experience, professional help to review, understand, and negotiate the deal before you sign over part of your company. At the very least, legal, accounting, and ideally an impartial business advisor/investment banker with experience in the types of deals you’re looking at.

After all, “All things will be clear and distinct to the man who does not hurry; haste is blind and improvident.”
– Livy, Ad Urbe Condita Libri, 9 BC

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

Lawyer Stuff 101 – What Does a Business Lawyer Do?

This is the second in my series of articles on how you, a business owner, can use your lawyer most effectively. The most frequent conversation I have when meeting with new clients is to explain the role of the lawyer in advising a business. Many have never worked with a lawyer before, or worked with one in a different area. Why are we useful, and what the hell do we actually do that adds value to your business? Once you know what we do, it’s much easier to use us effectively – saving you time, money, and heartache as your company evolves.

A lawyer’s job is to help businesses to understand and manage risk. Full stop.

On Risk

Most entrepreneurs are going into business because they have a great idea – a product or service that they believe they can sell. The act of going into business is risky in and of itself. You’re putting your time, money, reputation, and relationships on the line. The business world is a scary place, especially when you’re the small fish in the pond. Your competitors are constantly working to out-manoeuvre you. Your employees, contractors, investors, customers and suppliers have expectations and problems of their own. The tax man knocks on your loudly and frequently. There’s a maze of regulations to navigate.

Many of those risks are sight unseen for entrepreneurs. Some manage to bob and weave through them by chance, blissfully unaware of close calls. Often in a first meeting I have the unpleasant task of lifting the veil, and giving them a peek at the troubled waters they’re sailing in. Sometimes the business owner walks away with more worries on their mind than they came with. It’s not a fun realization for them, and it’s my least favourite part of the job. It is, however, reality.

The risks exist whether you realize they do or not. Would you rather not know, and be blindsided when something happens, or understand where the risks lie, what the potential consequences are, and be able to make plans to avoid them and minimize their effect on your business?

Keep your head in the sand if you like, but Stats Canada has found that 20% of startup businesses fail within the first year, and 50% don’t survive three years. The businesses that succeed tend to have sound legal and accounting advice from an early stage. If you have sound advice, and the business still fails, you’ll likely end up on more stable ground afterwards – with your personal assets, reputation, and relationships relatively intact.

Lawyers help businesses to manage risk in three main ways:

  • Advising on sound business practices
  • Advising on appropriate legal structures and relationships, and
  • Advising when insurance is wise

Each of these risk management techniques ties in with the others. I’ll talk about each in turn.

Sound Business Practices

The most common, cheapest, and often most effective is to cover your own ass by doing business the right way. Most of these don’t need a lawyer to dream up or implement.

The most common business disputes are about differences between what was promised and what was delivered, billing and payment disputes, employer-employee relationships, and on-premises injuries. Businesses frequently deal with Consumer Protection Act, employee safety, and harassment and Human Rights Code complaints. Complying with government regulation – such as licensing, zoning, Building Code, Fire Code, access for disabled persons, anti-spam, import/export rules, and tax are also sources of friction and risk. It can be a lot to deal with, but there are a few habits that’ll make life easier for you:

  • Do your reading. There is a ton of information out there from government websites, regulatory bodies, accountant and lawyer’s blogs, insurance companies, incubators, entrepreneur groups, and industry publications. Read it all. A responsible business owner knows what laws and regulations govern their industry, and what they need to do to colour between the lines.
  • Put it in writing. If there’s a dispute, what actually happened doesn’t matter – only what can be proved. Written records are more convincing than memory. If you do business over the phone or face to face, keep notes and send a follow up email summarizing what was said and agreed upon. Put employee job descriptions in writing.
  • Keep everything. Having things in writing is useless if you delete it too soon. The limitation period (meaning, the amount of time someone has to bring a lawsuit) in Ontario is two years after the problem is discovered. Do the math, and figure out how long to keep the records after dealing with someone. An IT nerd can burn years and years of data to DVD for you if storage space is an issue.
  • Don’t over-promise. Sometimes the pressure to make a sale can be immense, especially in the cash-poor early days of a business. It’s hard enough to keep people happy even when you do what you say. If you over-promise and under-deliver, or take on work you’re not equipped to do, it’ll come back to bite you in the end. The rear end…
  • Have policies in place. Especially if you have people working for you. There are tons of free resources from the Ministry of Labour, and HR professionals that can get you started. It’s wise to bounce these off your lawyer to make sure they’re current.

As your company grows, your lawyer and other advisors can help to flesh out the practices and policies in a way that suits your business.

Legal Structures

Here’s where I come in. While business practices are a good start, there’s no substitute for on-point legal advice to help minimize business risk. Legal advice costs money, and if you’re in the habit of seeking it before acting, you may wonder what the actual value added to your business is. Legal advice is a bit like bear repellent – the only way you know it’s working is that there are fewer bears around… but if a bear shows up on your doorstep with a lawsuit, the value becomes much more clear. Maybe I went too far with this analogy… I digress…

Sadly, much of what I do is work to clean up my clients’ self-inflicted messes. They try to save money on legal fees by trying to be their own lawyer. Sometimes the damage is irreparable. I’ve watched businesses go down in flames because of vague, improperly drafted contracts. I’ve seen clients held hostage by independent contractors because they didn’t put anything in writing before work started. I’ve seen people’s businesses stolen out from under them because they didn’t think independent legal advice was worthwhile. Even when the business is salvageable, they often end up spending two or three times as much to fix the problem than they would have on legal advice in the first place.

The business lawyer’s role usually falls in one of three categories:

  • Internal relationships. Clearly setting out the roles, responsibilities, and expectations between the founders of the business is essential. Sooner is better – ideally before the business starts to make (or lose) money. No matter what the form of business is, and no matter how good the intentions are at the start, as soon as money is involved, people’s recollection of the deal and expectations can change in a hurry. A house divided against itself cannot stand.
  • The back end of the business. Not only should your business structure make sense from a tax perspective, it should protect the founders, and facilitate long-term growth as much as possible. There are several forms of business available, each with their benefits and obligations. Choosing the right one, and keeping it in good standing with the government and other regulators is critical. Lawyers know what records need to be kept, and what approvals must be secured before taking certain actions. Investors and potential buyers will want to see that the proper decision-making processes were followed in running the company.
  • External relationships. Customers, suppliers, employees, investors, creditors, partners, joint-venturers, government, regulators, landlords, tenants, neighbours, industry associations, and advisors will all be looking out primarily for their own interests, as you should be for yours. Contracts are useful to set out what’s expected of each party, which I covered in detail in an earlier blog. Call your lawyer before trying to enter, break, or change a contract. You may also need help understanding what regulations apply to your business, and help you to colour between those lines.

Insurance

I’m no expert in insurance – my knowledge is limited to knowing when to recommend when it might be appropriate, and how it fits into your overall risk-management plan. I typically recommend insurance options to cover the gaps between your business practices and legal structures, and the risks you can’t hedge against that way.  A few of the common types are:

  • Commercial general liability. This coverage can cover slip & fall and other bodily injury, defamation, emotional pain and suffering, false advertising, medical expenses, and tenant/occupant liability.
  • Disability & key person. As discussed in my articles on contingency planning, these policies can help keep the business afloat if the owner/operator or a key employee is killed or injured and unable to work.
  • Directors & officers. A company can agree to protect its directors and officers in the event that they’re sued for things they did in the course of their duties.
  • Business interruption. Protecting against loss of income in the event of fire, flood, equipment breakdown, and other events beyond the business owner’s control.

Written opinions of lawyers, accountants, and other professionals which recommend a specific course of action as being legal or viable can also be a form of insurance. Your business should be able to rely on those opinions to make its decisions. If an opinion is wrong, and the business suffers losses as a consequence, it’s up to the professional (or their insurer) to make it right.

Bear in mind that insurance is a contract as well – so read it. Know what you want to be covered for, and make sure it’s included in the policy. Have an idea of what amounts of coverage you need for each type of insurance. Ensure it covers liability occurring in the places where your products or services will be delivered. Do some research into the reputation and claim denial rate of the insurance company you’re thinking of dealing with. Call your insurance agent when starting a new aspect of your business. Insurance is supposed to provide peace of mind – which ain’t much use if you don’t actually know what you’re covered for.

You probably already know that there’s a lot more to entrepreneurship than meets the eye, if you’re doing it well. Getting legal advice can be a delicate balancing act as far as cost vs. benefit – especially when cash is tight in the early stages. Sometimes you need more work than you think, other times you need less. Each business’ needs will be different, and the only way to know for sure is to ask questions. Know what you don’t know, and get an expert when you need one. I happen to know a guy…. 😉

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw

Lawyer Stuff 101 – Contract Negotiations

It’s one thing to have professional advisors – lawyers, accountants, etc. – to point you in the right direction. It’s a whole other thing to know how to use them properly. I’ve found it’s a pretty steep learning curve for most entrepreneurs to figure out how to receive advice from, and give instructions to their lawyer. So, this is the first in a new feature I’m calling “Lawyer Stuff 101” – what a lawyer can do for you in different situations, and how the process should work.

I’ve been harping a lot on contracts lately – generally, and for record labels – since it’s a big part of my practice, so the process of birthing a contract seems a logical place to start. Signing a contract without a lawyer is like doing your taxes without a calculator – just because you can do it doesn’t mean that you should. Get your lawyer involved early in the process, as our kind know more about the points that should be covered in different kinds of deals. It’s easier to ask for something from the start than to go back to the drawing board when you realize that your deal has gaping holes in it.

Lawyers do three main things with contracts – writing them (drafting), reviewing them, and help in negotiating them. I’ll touch on each in turn.

Writing Contracts

Usually the party that’s offering the goods or services is the one who draws up the contract. The way your company does business will dictate a lot of the terms of the contract – how goods are ordered, packaged, shipped, and paid for, for instance – so it makes sense that you’d spell that out for the other party first.

It may seem odd, but it’s usually cheaper to get your lawyer to write a whole contract for you than to go through and tweak something you’ve written yourself. In order to “tweak” your contract, the lawyer’s got to review it first (see reviewing, below), and then rework it to say what you want it to say.

I usually send my clients a list of the things that they should consider for the type of contract they’re writing up, and ask them for a list of the things that they want in it. This often involves talking to the other party and figuring out the who, what, when, why, where, and how of the deal. Once that’s done, I’ll put together a first draft of the contract and send it to the client to review it.

Once you’ve read the draft, there’s usually a phone call or an in-person meeting to go through it, clause-by-clause, to make sure it says what you want it to say. Sometimes just talking through an issue raises other points that need to be added or changed in the contract. I make the changes and send an updated draft. It may take some back & forth to get it just right.

Once you’ve got a contract, it goes to the other side. Depending on what the contract’s about, there may be some negotiation involved before you can put pen to paper. The end goal is for you to have a contract that everyone understands, and says what it’s supposed to.

Reviewing Contracts

Any time you’re presented with a contract, it’s important that you understand what it says before you sign it. Contracts are binding legal agreements, and there can be major consequences – like lawsuits – for breaking them.

It’s up to you, the client, how thorough of a review you want. The thoroughness of review depends on a bunch of things – your budget, and the size of the deal tend to be the biggest factors. A review and legal opinion will be more expensive and more thorough than a general overview and flagging of key issues. The bigger the commitments being made, the more important the deal, or the more money involved, the more important it is to get it right.

When my clients send me a contract for review, I’ll ask them to tell me in their own words the deal that they think they’ve made – so I know whether or not the contract actually says that. For a thorough review, my work starts with a quick read-through, to get familiar with the structure of the contract, and its general terms. I may ask a few follow-up questions at this point, or for copies of other agreements or documents that are referred to in the contract.

The next step is a thorough read-through – word by word, clause by clause – to understand the finer points of the deal. I’m looking to make sure that the contract doesn’t contradict itself (consistency), that it ties in with other documents or agreements, that it’s fair and matches the deal you think you’ve made, that there’s nothing illegal, and that there are no significant or unusual risks (liability) that you’re taking on.

The last step is to give a written legal opinion on the contract. In the opinion I’ll explain how the deal works as written, and point out differences from the deal you thought you’ve made. I’ll flag unusual or particularly risky clauses, inconsistencies, and illegal clauses. The amount of detail in the opinion depends on the thoroughness of review you’ve asked for. Once I’ve sent you the opinion, and you’ve had a chance to read it through (a couple of times, at least), we’ll set up a call or a meeting to discuss it, which often leads to….

Negotiation

Most business contracts have room for negotiation, as both sides want a fair deal that will grow their business. The negotiation process is where you try to add as many of the things that you want to make the deal better for you, and to get rid of the things that expose you to unnecessary risk. That said, risk is inherent in business, and usually each side will take a share of it. How much risk you’re willing to accept is up to you. My job is to let you know that it’s there, and recommend a course of action – but it’s up to you to make the decision. Once you know the risk’s there, you can take steps to minimize its potential impact.

The first step of contract negotiation, which is usually tied in with the discussion of my legal opinion, is figuring out what you want. What are your must-haves, nice-to-haves, and things you don’t care about one way or the other? Then we try to figure out what the other side wants and why they want it, and brainstorm ways to work through potentially sticky negotiating points.

I usually recommend that the business people talk directly, before getting the lawyers involved in negotiations. It could be a quick phone call or email to discuss the main points, and get an agreement in principle on the proposed changes. This “meeting of the minds” between the business decision makers helps to keep the lawyers on track when sussing out the details.

Whoever is proposing changes will then have their lawyer make the changes they want to the contract, and send you back a clean copy and a “black line” version with the changes highlighted. The other lawyer will review those, advise on any variation from the agreement you made with the other party, and any new risks. The contract may get bounced back and forth like this a few times to hammer out the finer points, and the lawyers may need a phone call or two to finish it off. Any changes from the deal you’ve instructed me to get will have to be approved by you.

Conclusion

Putting together contracts can be a drawn out process, especially for complicated business deals. Most lawyers will use some variation of the above process. Start planning well in advance, and get your lawyer involved at an early stage. When it’s all said and done, you’ve got a contract that you can live with, and rely on in case it goes south.

Mike Hook
Intrepid Lawyer
http://intrepidlaw.ca
@MikeHookLaw